Amazing Facts About Cancer in New York

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Amazing Facts About Cancer in New York
Amazing Facts About Cancer in New York

NEW YORK–February 14, 2019–So many people are diagnosed with cancer every year in New York City that they could fill Madison Square Garden, twice—40,126. That’s according to our report “Reducing the Cancer Burden in New York City.”

Key Findings Include – Cancer in New York

  • On average, approximately 40,126 New York City residents were diagnosed with cancer annually between 2011-2015, with 12,453 dying from the disease annually during this period.
  • On average, approximately 771 New York City residents were diagnosed with cancer and 241 individuals died from cancer each week from 2011-2015.
  • The number of people diagnosed with cancer annually from 2011-2015 on average was nearly twice the capacity of Madison Square Garden.
  • Four cancers – lung, prostate, breast and colorectal – account for nearly half (47.4 percent) of all cancer diagnoses and nearly half (45 percent) of all cancer deaths in New York City from 2011-2015.
  • Lung and bronchus cancer is the single largest cause of cancer death, causing nearly 2668 deaths yearly from 2011-2015. Colorectal (1,240), female breast (1,027), and Pancreatic (933) cancers were the second, third and fourth most frequent causes of mortality.
  • Female breast cancer is New York City’s most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, with 5,887 women diagnosed annually between 2011-15, whereas prostate cancer was the most common among men (5,347 new cases annually from 2011-2015).
  • Lung and bronchus cancer is New York City’s most common cause of cancer death among women, with 1237 women cancer deaths caused annually between 2011-15, and men (1430 deaths annually from 2011-2015).
  • Men and women living on Staten Island have the highest incidence rate of new cancer cases overall on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • Men and women on Staten Island experience the highest rates of lung and bronchus cancer.
  • Women in Manhattan and men in the Bronx have the highest rates of female breast and prostate cancer respectively on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • Men living in PUMA “Neighborhoods” Morris Heights, Fordham South and Mount Hope (#3707), Brownsville & Ocean Hill (#4007), and Tottenville, Great Kills and Annadale (#3901) have the approximate highest cancer incidence rate overall among men. (See page 15 for the definition of PUMA Neighborhoods)
  • Men living in PUMA “Neighborhoods” Jackson Heights and North Corona (#4102), Sunnyside & Woodside (#4109), and Greenpoint and Williamsburg have the approximate lowest cancer incidence rate overall among men. (See page 15 for the definition of PUMA Neighborhoods)
  • Women living in PUMA “Neighborhoods” Tottenville, Great Kills and Annadale (#3901), New Springville and South Beach (#3902), and Bay Ridge and Dyker Heights (#4013) have the approximate highest cancer incidence rate overall among women. (See page 15 for the definition of PUMA Neighborhoods)
  • Women living in PUMA “Neighborhoods” Greenpoint and Williamsburg (#4001), Jackson Heights and North Corona (#4102) and Washington Heights, Inwood and Marble Hill (#3801) have the approximate lowest cancer incidence rate overall among women. (See page 15 for the definition of PUMA Neighborhoods)
  • Non-Hispanic Whites have the highest rate, 510 cancer cases per 100,000 males and females, of all cancers on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • Non-Hispanic Blacks have the highest cancer death rate, 167 cancer deaths per 100,000 males and females, of all cancers on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • Citywide, only 40.9 percent of colorectal cancer diagnosed in men and 40.8 percent of colorectal cancer diagnosed in women are detected at an early stage on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • Citywide, only 44 percent of cervical cancer diagnosed in women are detected at an early stage on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • Citywide, only 21.6 percent of lung and bronchus cancer diagnosed in men and 28.3 percent of lung and bronchus cancer diagnosed in women are detected at an early stage on average annually between 2011-2015.
  • About 30 percent of all cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking.
  • The combined effects of excess body weight, poor diet, alcohol consumption, and physical inactivity are associated with 18 percent of all cancer cases.
  • Certain cancers caused by infectious agents, such as the human papillomavirus (HPV), could be prevented through vaccination.

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